VRU Speaker Showcase – Day 1

Order may be different than on the program page…

China’s National Sword’s Impact on the El Cerrito Recycling Center

Laurenteen Brazil
Waste Prevention Specialist, City of El Cerrito

Laurenteen has over 18 years of experience in the recycling industry. The Waste Prevention Specialist at the City of El Cerrito, she provides educational outreach to the community and works directly with businesses for legislative compliance. Over the course of her career she has served on both the NCRA and CRRA Boards. A certified ZWUSA Zero Waste Community Associate, she is an ardent proponent of Zero Waste goals and advocates for lifestyle behavior change. In her spare time, she volunteers to help green a K thru 8 school and her church. She enjoys outdoor activities and aspires continually to be impactful. []

Are Compostable Products Being Composted?

Leslie Lukcas
Executive Director, Zero Waste Sonoma

Leslie has worked over 20 years in solid waste and resource management industry and, prior to this appointment, was the Director of Zero Waste at SCS Engineers a solid waste, recycling and organics management consulting firm for 13 years. She also had her own consulting company for 7 years.

She serves on the board of directors of the National Recycling Coalition and the Zero Waste International Alliance and is an advisor to Zero Waste USA and California Resource Recovery Association. She is the founder of numerous stakeholder groups including the (GIVE) Council, Compost Coalition of Sonoma County, Sonoma County Zero Waste Task Force and the Zero Waste North Bay Symposium. Leslie has spent her career designing and implementing comprehensive sustainability and Zero Waste programs for large institutions, public agencies, venues, and events throughout California and the nation. []

Bringing Reuse Into Food Service Through Policy and Business Innovation

Miriam Gordon
Program Director, Upstream

As Policy Director with UPSTREAM, Miriam is a leading architect and incubator of local and state policies aimed at making the Throw Away culture a thing of the past. Previously, as the California Director of Clean Water Action, Miriam launched ReThink Disposable, a program that has demonstrated that reducing throw away products in food service saves food businesses money and improves customers’ dining experiences. Over the last 20 years, she has been a leading California advocate for policies aimed at reducing plastic pollution and has worked with local, state, and federal agencies implementing pollution prevention and water quality programs. []

Fighting Plastic Pollution: California Legislative Efforts

Genevieve Abedon
Policy Associate, Clean Seas Lobbying Coalition / Ecoconsult

At Ecoconsult, Genevieve represents the Clean Seas Lobbying Coalition, a coalition of non-profit organizations dedicated to source reduction solutions to the plastic pollution crisis. She advocates on their behalf for statewide legislation in the California Legislature and Executive Branch, as well as various processes amongst regulatory agencies. Before joining Ecoconsult in 2017, Genevieve worked on statewide and local plastic pollution policies and campaigns for Californians Against Waste. In the past, she has worked as a Landfill Reduction Technician at various events and sailed across the North Atlantic Ocean studying microplastic pollution with The 5 Gyres Institute. []

Debate: Collecting Low Value Plastics

Topic: California Communities Should No Longer Collect Plastic In Their Curbside Recycling Programs

Head Royce High School Debate Team and NCRA Mentors:

Pro:  Patty Moore, Rebecca Jewell
Con: Martin Bourque, Peter Slote

Recycling Rewards: Recycling Incentive Contest

Derek  Crutchfield  
Recycling Coordinator, City of Vallejo and Board Member, SWANA Gold Rush Chapter

Derek has been in the Solid Waste and Recycling field for approximately 25 years. His career began with an internship with the City of Napa, which eventually led to a part-time position with the City of Fairfield. In 2000 Derek graduated from Sonoma State University with a BA in Environmental  Studies. He eventually went to work for the City of Vallejo where he has been employed for the last 18 years. Derek is currently on the SWANA Gold Rush Chapter Board and the California Product Stewardship Council the Board. Derek is an outgoing and fun loving recycling enthusiast!! []

Reducing and Rescuing Oakland’s Surplus Food

Wanda Redic
Senior Recycling Specialist, City of Oakland and Board Member, California Resource Recovery Association

Wanda began her career in solid waste and recycling in 1994 at the City of Berkeley developing and implementing an ISO 14000 Environmental Management System and commercial and residential food scraps collection service. In 2007 Wanda became a Recycling Specialist in Oakland. She has over 26 years of service in government recycling and organics programs. Wanda currently manages outreach programs, assists with managing franchise agreements, develops and implements programs for compliance with regional and state mandatory recycling and organics laws. Most recently Wanda has lead Oakland’s participation in SB 1383 rulemaking and its implementation including edible food recovery program development. []

SB 1383 Model Tools Overview

Monaliza Noor 
Associate Analyst, HF&H Consultants

Monaliza Noor is an Associate Analyst at HF&H Consultants. She recently assisted with the development of CalRecycle’s SB 1383 implementation tools and case studies. To help jurisdictions plan for SB 1383, Ms. Noor has also helped develop a number of SB 1383-specific tools that identify requirements; delineate which entity (City, hauler, or a third-party) will do what; and, allow for cost-benefit analysis. In addition to her SB 1383 focused work, Ms. Noor also assists in hauler performance reviews, solid waste and recycling contract analysis, and procurement evaluations. Before joining HF&H Consultants in 2018, Ms. Noor worked for the City of Oakland’s environmental services division. In 2016, she earned a Master of Science degree in Environmental Management from the University of San Francisco.

VRU Program

RECYCLING UPDATE GOES VIRTUAL!
CELEBRATE ST. PATRICK’S DAY IN OCTOBER!

NCRA’s Recycling Update will be held on-line on Monday, October 5 and Tuesday, October 6, from 12-5pm. Two half-days. Registration is $75 for Current Members and $135 for Non-Members. Details

Join NCRA                              Register Today

Speaker Showcase – Day 1
Speaker Showcase – Day 2

PROGRAM

Interactive Topic Lunches, 10-Minute Presentations, Entertaining Breaks and – drum roll, Debates! The debates will be conducted by members of a local high school debate team coached by subject matter experts from both sides of the issue.

Presentations will be from innovators and experts in waste prevention, food rescue, reuse, recycling, composting and Zero Waste.  Join 300 Zero Waste professionals and advocates for networking and small group discussions of current topics.

The program (subject to change) is as follows:

MONDAY, OCTOBER 5
12:00pm Topic Lunch
1:00pm David Krueger
Welcome
Leslie Lukacs Zero Waste Sonoma Are Compostable Products Being Composted?
Laurenteen Brazil City of El Cerrito National Sword’s Impact on the El Cerrito Recycling Center
Genevieve Abedon Clean Seas Lobbying Coalition / Ecoconsult Fighting Plastic Pollution: California Legislative Efforts
Miriam Gordon Upstream Bringing Reuse Into Food Service Through Policy and Business Innovation
2:00pm Break: Entertainment / Activity TBD
2:15pm Debate Team Head Royce High School Collecting Low Value Plastics
3:00pm Break: Entertainment / Activity TBD
Monaliza Noor HF&H Consultants SB 1383 Model Tools Overview
Wanda Redic City of Oakland Reduce and Rescue Oakland’s Surplus Food
Derek Crutchfield City of Vallejo Recycling Rewards: Recycling Incentive Contest
4-5pm+ Virtual Networking
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6
12:00pm Topic Lunch
1:00pm David Krueger
Welcome
1:10 pm Wes Sullens U.S. Green Building Council Update on Recycling, Circular Economy, and Embodied Carbon in LEED v4.1
Peter Schultze-Allen EOA, Inc. What do Stormwater and Zero Waste have in Common?
Brock Hill & John Moore Premier Recycle Company / Law Office of John Douglas Moore How Franchising Impairs Recovery of C&D
Tony Hale San Francisco Estuary Institute – Aquatic Science Center Accelerating Trash Detection in the SF Bay Area using Advanced Technology
2:00pm Break: Entertainment / Activity
2:15pm Debate Team Head Royce High School Mixed Waste Processing
3:00pm Break: Entertainment / Activity
3:15pm Magdalena Donoso GAIA – Latin America & the Caribbean Wastepickers: Key Agents for Zero Waste Cities
Julia Lang Downtown Streets Team I Clean the Streets, Because I’m from the Streets: How to Use Environmentalism as a Vehicle to End Homelessness
Michael Bisch Yolo Food Bank Transforming Wasted Food Recovery In A Small Rural County
4-5pm+ Virtual Networking

Zero Waste in the Time of COVID-19

By Nik Balachandran, Founder and CEO, Zabble Inc.

None of us expected the world to dramatically change within a span of a few months. Businesses, governments and people all have had to adjust to the new normal in different ways. The solid waste and recycling industry has seen its own share of changes. We have seen temporary policy changes, relaxing bag bans in grocery stores, a shift in waste volumes in commercial and residential settings and the introduction of new types of waste like PPE.

At first glance, it may seem that the amount of waste has gone down as businesses shut down during the first few months as cities and counties instituted shelter-in-place regulations. Only essential workers were allowed to continue to work at physical workplaces and the rest working from home. Commercial waste volumes did drop by up to 40% in many counties while residential and multi-family volumes increased to make up for it with more online orders.

The interesting thing to ask, perhaps, is what the per capita waste generation looks like pre-COVID and now. While the current numbers are not readily available we can look at pre-covid data. According to EPA, the average waste generated per capita in the US every day is 4.5 lbs, out of which only 35% is recycled or composted. The rest ends up in incinerators and landfills. Forty-four percent of this waste stream is made up of paper/paperboard, organics and plastics. It was pretty apparent that 5.6 million commercial buildings generated more waste annually than 136 million residential properties.

Our singular focus at Zabble is to help these organizations that operated out of commercial buildings to achieve Zero Waste. So in 2018 we developed a software paradigm to track programs that incrementally made progress (amount of waste reduction, decreased landfill waste and contamination in all streams) toward Zero Waste, because Zero Waste is as much a journey as it is a destination. We have been working with some of the largest educational institutions and corporations in helping them track and adjust their Zero Waste programs. That is, until Covid changed the landscape of waste.

Reusable and second-hand sharing practices have come to a standstill. Online shopping has almost doubled leading to increased cardboard boxes. More take-out food orders have substantially increased delivery in food containers and plastic bags. PPE litter has become the latest nuisance to plague the environment. More than 200 million masks and 1 billion gloves were ordered to be shipped by FEMA alone by June 2020. Hospitals are seeing a dramatic increase in PPE usage and disposal. “Before the pandemic, the 23 Northwell Health hospitals in New York used about 250,000 pairs of gloves a day; now, it’s 500,000 pairs”, says Chief Expense Officer Donna Drummond. One study by the American Nurses Association found that “43% of waste produced by infectious isolation procedures was attributed to personal protective equipment (PPE)”

There is a massive uptick in single-use disposables fueled by the false claim that disposables are safer than reusable options. This myth was debunked by a group of 100 experts comprising scientists, doctors, professors and epidemiologists.

So where is all this heading?

It is safe to assume the per capita generation of waste is higher now than pre-COVID. As businesses reopen the primary focus is the health and safety of its staff and customers. However, it is also a time to reflect on the new waste footprint.

    • To keep daily operations, supply chains and waste infrastructure resilient organizations must track the amount of waste, type and origin within their buildings or facilities.
    • Track unused supplies in the waste stream to excess purchasing habits and contamination to improper disposing of items (like PPE) in the right bins.
    • Use reusable options where available.
    • Constant communication with the right messaging can boost staff morale and lead to a cleaner and safer environment.

By being aware and conscious of our habits in the present, we can create a new normal that is better than the past.

For more information on Zabble, visit www.zabbleinc.com.

Here are some recently published articles from Resource Recycling and Waste 360.

 

NCRA/NRC DEI Webinar Recording

WHO IS AT THE TABLE?

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion
in Waste and Recycling
August 27, 2020

Recording              Speaker Bios

Presented by: The National Recycling Coalition (NRC) and the Northern California Recycling Association (NCRA) in coordination with the NRC Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Council, the NCRA DEI Committee and the Ohio Recycling Coalition. Produced by Portia Sinnott, NCRA Vice President and Zero Waste USA Program Director.

This webinar’s objectives are to motivate the waste and recycling industry to actively explore and discuss DEI issues and initiatives, and inspire individuals and organizations to create their own mandates. We will address the issues via succinct introductory presentations with commentary, hold a robust intra-panel discussion and follow that with a lively Q&A session!

What does Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) mean in the Waste and Recycling Industry?

Are we leading the way or stumbling behind? Does anyone have a handle on the statistics? Has your business, agency or non-profit adopted DEI initiatives? Are they actively being implemented and tracked? Are the benefits clear to all involved? What factors are being addressed – age, race, gender identity, sexual orientation, class, ability, language and/or cultural background? Does your actual workforce reflect these commitments – in front of the house: management/decision makers, as well as the back of the house: workforce/membership? Are there efforts underway to stimulate workforce training and advancement?

PANEL

  • INITIAL SLIDES
  • Moderator and Commentator, Arley Owens, Executive Director, Ohio Recycling Coalition, former NRC Board Member, organizing member of the NRC DEI Council, and former Chair of the NRC Communications Committee and the Minorities Recycling Council
  • DEI Introduction and Industry Situational Report, Sophia Huda, Vice President, Ohio Recycling Coalition, member of the Manhattan Solid Waste Advisory Board and Adjunct Sustainability Professor, The New School, New York SLIDES
  • Developing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Mandates, Faye Christoforo, Executive Director, Post-Landfill Action Network (PLAN) SLIDES
  • Sustainable And Safe Recycling, Alina Bekkerman, NCRA Board Member and San Francisco Conservation Corps, Program Manager and
    Felisia Castañeda, NCRA Member and Recology San Francisco
    Environmental Learning Center Supervisor SLIDES
  • Moving Forward Together, Abrilla Robinson, Vice President, Ohio Recycling Coalition’s and Chair of the Ohio Recycling Coalition’s newly created Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Council. Past President of the National Recycling Coalition Minorities Recycling Council and organizing member of the new NRC DEI Council.

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